Both Seen and Unseen

I recently posted this story on my Facebook page. I was responding to this article which triggered me. This article really touched a nerve. Recently a neighbor in a building where I've lived almost 20 years told my mother to leave the stoop. My mother, an elderly woman in her 70s, had stopped to rest there while waiting for a family member to pick her up in the middle of the afternoon. My mother had been on the phone with her family, directing them where to go. Apparently my neighbor heard her through the window and felt it was appropriate to walk out of the building in order to ask my mother to leave the stoop. My mother was stunned. She knows this neighbor--knows her children. We've all been there…
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The Things We Hold On To

So, I'm in the process of moving. I allotted myself quite a bit of time to this process knowing that it meant that I was scaling back entirely. Getting rid of books, contemplating what to do about old journals, and now, finally trying to figure out what to do with the things in storage that have been sitting there for years. Including these old VHS tapes. As you can tell from the browning labels, these tapes are old. I don't even have the technology to watch them anymore. Still, something in my mind throbbed. I worried that some long ago forgotten memory was captured on one of these tapes. I had vague memories of filming videos of college fun. I had an idea that there was something of value hidden…
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The Struggle to Survive

A new article¬†about the myth of meritocracy really hit home for me this week. The article cites a newly published study in the journal of Child Development that suggests that young people of color who grow up believing in the American dream, show a decline in self esteem during middle school. This is one of those reports that I find validates things we already knew. The myth of pulling yourself up by your booth straps to recognized success completely crumbled for me in grad school. In fact, I was surprised how hard this reality hit me since I assumed I had known the truth about meritocracy (and I even taught about meritocracy!). I was an older graduate student. Coming out of the corporate world, I was different from my peers…
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Journal Exercise

I've always kept a journal. I wrote out my frustrations, my daily musings about life and happiness. I was an irregular writer. So I have 10-15 journals, some half filled. I abandoned them when I became bored with myself and the things I was writing about--which was often. In my moving process, I came across some old journals, previously forgotten, hidden under layers of dust in my storage unit. These journals were more time-specific. They were journals from a trip I had gone on about 15 years ago. I had forgotten they existed. I read through some of it last night and it made me cringe. I can hardly remember the young woman who wrote those entries. Did she really feel that way? Was that what it was like to…
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Reading the World, Reading Myself

[caption id="attachment_56" align="alignnone" width="225"] Goodbye best friend books![/caption] If you know me, you know I am passionate about books and passionate about cultural consciousness. I just feel we should all be awake, reading the world to learn about ourselves (that's a Paulo Freire term as you probably know). Recently I began the process of moving and I decided to start with my books. Before I began to move my books, I referenced The Life Changing Magic Tidying Up¬† to give me some perspective. The author, Marie Kondo suggests that you hold each book and ask if it brings you joy. If not, toss it. If so, keep it. Does this book bring me joy? Ack! What a question! I took my books off the shelf and sat in the middle…
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